We Buy Houses in Immokalee

In Any Condition – Price Range – Or Location 
Sell Your Immokalee, Florida House Quickly For CASH and without hassle or obligations.  PROMISE!

 

If you are on this site, obviously you have a Immokalee real estate for sale you want or need to sell quickly because of the stress of burden it’s causing or you just want to “be done” with a property.

We are currently looking to buy houses with cash in the Immokalee area including all of Collier County and since we can pay with cash, we are able to close very quickly or simply on your time frame.  We are the local We Buy Houses Immokalee that gives you an all cash offer but more importantly treat you FAIR.

If you want to sell your Immokalee house… we’re ready to give you a fair all-cash offer.

Working out a deal is creating a WIN WIN for you and us.  By the way… we don’t want to list your home, we want to BUY real estate property here in South Florida, both residential houses or apartments.

We Buy Houses in all Collier County including Immokalee – in any condition… as-is… NO TRICKS OR GIMMICKS


History of Immokalee

The land that we refer to today as Immokalee, has been home to several different Indian tribes over time; Calusa Indians, Seminole Indians, and Miccosukee Indians.  In the late 1870s, the well-known Indian trader, William Allen, settled in Immokalee, and just a few years later, the land was officially recognized by the federal government as a community.  The region was then known as Gopher Ridge, and then eventually renamed to Immokalee, the Seminole word for “my home”.

The land was rather isolated until the 1920s when the Atlantic Coast Line Railway extended its rails, opening a direct route for trade and communication.  Barron Collier needed to have a trade route from Everglades city to Immokalee, to continue the rapid growth of Southwest Florida.

Today, Immokalee is still home to lumber, oil, and ranching industries.  It is known as the local leader in agriculture and production and is one of Collier County’s largest non-coastal communities.  The legacy of the Seminoles is still prevalent today, with the construction of the Seminole casino and the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum.